Public Notices

 

                                                                                Cuba City Celebrates  Best Downtown Revitalization Award

On Friday, April 28th​, Cuba City celebrated the WEDC Main Street Award for Best Downtown Revitalization for a City under 5,500 Population with 110 people attending a dinner at Banfield's Swiss Haus. State Senator Howard Marklein and Grant County Board Chair Bob Keeney spoke at the event along with WEDC Downtown Development and Regional Director Jason Scott, who presented the award to Mayor Tom Gile. The emcee for the evening was Drew Nussbaum of the Wisconsin Tourism Council.

This selection recognizes the efforts of the fourteen partners involved in the recent upgrades to Cuba City’s Main Street. These changes include the extensive façade improvement program, new LED lighting, the Cuba City State Bank Clock, and the painting of the Presidential Caboose among many other efforts. Much of the funding for these projects came from the business and property owners of Cuba City as well as contributions from the general public.

In addition, Tim Gile and the Cuba City Chamber of Commerce was recognized for their efforts on behalf of the City as was Donna Rogers and the City of Presidents Committee.

 

Gile_Rogers_2017                               Howard at CC award dinner                                   Senator Marklein speaking at dinner

                                                                                                   ​Annual Water Quality Report

 

2016 Consumer Confidence Report Data
CUBA CITY WATERWORKS, PWS ID: 12200925

Water System Information

If you would like to know more about the information contained in this report, please contact Tom Longhenry at (608) 778-3244.

Opportunity for input on decisions affecting your water quality

Third Wednesday of the month at 5:00 pm at the City Hall Council Chambers

Health Information

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency's safe drinking water hotline (800-426-4791).

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune systems disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Environmental Protection Agency's safe drinking water hotline (800-426-4791).

Source(s) of Water

Source ID

Source

Depth (in feet)

Status

2

Groundwater

1467

Active

3

Groundwater

1590

Active

To obtain a summary of the source water assessment please contact, Tom Longhenry at (608) 778-3244.

Educational Information

The sources of drinking water, both tap water and bottled water, include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

  • Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife.
  • Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally- occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining or farming.
  • Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff and residential uses.
  • Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff and septic systems.
  • Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which shall provide the same protection for public health.

Definitions

Term

Definition

AL

Action Level: The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

Level 1 Assessment

A Level 1 assessment is a study of the water system to identify potential problems and determine, if possible, why total coliform bacteria have been found in our water system.

Level 2 Assessment

A Level 2 assessment is a very detailed study of the water system to identify potential problems and determine, if possible, why an E. coli MCL violation has occurred or why total coliform bacteria have been found in our water system, or both, on multiple occasions.

MCL

Maximum Contaminant Level: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

MCLG

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

MFL

million fibers per liter

MRDL

Maximum residual disinfectant level: The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

MRDLG

Maximum residual disinfectant level goal: The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.

mrem/year

millirems per year (a measure of radiation absorbed by the body)

NTU

Nephelometric Turbidity Units

pCi/l

picocuries per liter (a measure of radioactivity)

ppm

parts per million, or milligrams per liter (mg/l)

ppb

parts per billion, or micrograms per liter (ug/l)

ppt

parts per trillion, or nanograms per liter

ppq

parts per quadrillion, or picograms per liter

TCR

Total Coliform Rule

TT

Treatment Technique: A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

Detected Contaminants

Your water was tested for many contaminants last year. We are allowed to monitor for some contaminants less frequently than once a year. The following tables list only those contaminants which were detected in your water. If a contaminant was detected last year, it will appear in the following tables without a sample date. If the contaminant was not monitored last year, but was detected within the last 5 years, it will appear in the tables below along with the sample date.

Disinfection Byproducts

Contaminant (units)

Site

MCL

MCLG

Level Found

Range

Sample Date (if prior to 2016)

Violation

Typical Source of Contaminant

HAA5 (ppb)

D-109

60

60

2

2

 

No

By-product of drinking water chlorination

TTHM (ppb)

D-109

80

0

0.0

0.0

 

No

By-product of drinking water chlorination

Inorganic Contaminants

Contaminant (units)

Site

MCL

MCLG

Level Found

Range

Sample Date (if prior to 2016)

Violation

Typical Source of Contaminant

BARIUM (ppm)

 

2

2

0.053

0.050 – 0.053

7/29/2014

No

Discharge of drilling wastes; Discharge from metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits

FLUORIDE (ppm)

 

4

4

1.0

0.0 – 1.0

7/29/2014

No

Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories

NICKEL (ppb)

 

100

 

13.6000

0.0000 – 13.6000

7/29/2014

No

Nickel occurs naturally in soils, ground water and surface waters and is often used in electroplating, stainless steel and alloy products.

NITRATE (N03-N) (ppm)

 

10

10

2.86

0.00 – 2.86

 

No

Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits

SELENIUM (ppb)

 

50

50

1

0 – 1

7/29/2014

No

Discharge from petroleum and metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits; Discharge from mines

SODIUM (ppm)

 

n/a

n/a

16.00

5.32 – 16.00

7/29/2014

No

n/a

 

Contaminant (units)

Action Level

MCLG

90th Percentile Level Found

# of Results

Sample Date (if prior to 2016)

Violation

Typical Source of Contaminant

COPPER (ppm)

AL=1.3

1.3

0.1990

0 of 10 results were above the action level.

7/29/2014

No

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives

LEAD (ppb)

AL=15

0

1.54

0 of 10 results were above the action level.

7/29/2014

No

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits

Radioactive Contaminants

Contaminant (units)

Site

MCL

MCLG

Level Found

Range

Sample Date (if prior to 2016)

Violation

Typical Source of Contaminant

GROSS ALPHA, EXCL. R & U (pCi/l)

 

15

0

4.4

3.4 – 4.4

7/29/2014

No

Erosion of natural deposits

RADIUM, (226 + 228) (pCi/l)

 

5

0

2.7

1.2 – 2.7

7/29/2014

No

Erosion of natural deposits

GROSS ALPHA, INCL. R & U (n/a)

 

n/a

n/a

4.4

3.4 – 4.4

7/29/2014

No

Erosion of natural deposits

Synthetic Organic Contaminants including Pesticides and Herbicides

Contaminant (units)

Site

MCL

MCLG

Level Found

Range

Sample Date (if prior to 2016)

Violation

Typical Source of Contaminant

DI(2-ETHYLHEXYL) PHTHALATE (ppb)

 

6

0

1.3

1.3

7/29/2014

No

Discharge from rubber and chemical factories

Additional Health Information

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. Cuba City Waterworks is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

                                                                                                Annual Zoning Process Posting

As required by the State of Wisconsin, the City of Cuba City maintains a list of persons who submit a request to receive notice of any proposed zoning action that affects the allowable use of the person’s property.

If the Plan Commission completes action on any zoning proposal, and the Common Council is prepared to vote on the zoning ordinance, the City shall send a notice, which contains a copy or summary of the proposed zoning ordinance, to each person on the list whose property, the allowable use of which, may be affected by the zoning ordinance. The notice shall be by mail or in any reasonable form that is agreed to. The City of Cuba City may charge each person on the list who receives a notice by first class mail a fee that does not exceed the approximate cost of providing the notice to the person. An ordinance may take effect even if the City fails to send the notice. (Wisconsin Statues Section 62.23(7)(d)(4).)

To request to be added to the notification list please contact the City of Cuba City Clerk-Treasurer by phone, fax, email or U.S. Mail as follows:

Jill M. Hill, Clerk-Treasurer
City of Cuba City
108 N. Main Street
Cuba City, WI 53807
Phone: 608-744-2152
Email: jhill@wppienergy.org

 

                                                                                       

                                                                                      5th Annual Cuba City Community Market

 

Cuba City’s Community Market will return for its fifth year in the City’s beautiful Veteran’s Park. The market will be held on the third Wednesday of each month from May through September. Last year’s market saw as many as 36 vendors offering the best in local produce, crafts, plants, baked goods and personal services. Market hours are from 3:30 until 6:30, rain or shine.

Family activities and a variety of locally sponsored events will be featured at each month’s market. There are still sponsorship opportunities available for local businesses.

The cost to become a vendor remains the same as last year. The fee schedule is $30 for the full five markets if paid on or before April 3rd, $40 for the full year after that date or $10 per market. Reserved sites are available on a first come basis, with payment for the full season.

A meeting on the Community Market will be held at City Hall on April 4th at 6:00 p.m. to discuss the promotion of the market and answer any questions.

For a vendor application, registration/payment or further information, please visit Cuba City City Hall at 108 N Main Street, or the Market page on this website.2017 market flyer II

                                                                                   Cuba City Fourth Annual Community Garden

Reservations for plots in the Cuba City Community Garden are now being accepted. Information including the 2017 lease and brochure are now available on the Garden page on this website or at City Hall at 108 N. Main Street. Families or individuals can rent an individual garden plot for the summer of 2017 or volunteer in the communal garden plot. The lots are 10’ by 12’ and rent for $20 per year. Additional lots are available at $10 per year.

The garden operates in partnership with the Cuba City School District and the Cuba City FFA. Gardening advice is available from five of our area Master Gardeners.

For further information, please contact Bob Jones at Cuba City, 608-744-2152 or via email at cubacitycdc@gmail.com

 

 

                                                                                         2017 Street Resurfacing Plans for Cuba City

Streets chosen for reconstructs include:                                                                                                                                                      

  1. Benton Street: Main St. to Madison St.
  2. McKinley St.: Jackson St. to Randolph St.

Streets chosen for Overlays:

  1. School St.: Calhoun St. to Troy St.
  2. School St.: Roosevelt to Palmer St.
  3. Palmer St.: School St. to Randolph St.
  4. Jackson St.: Roosevelt St. to Calhoun St.
  5. Washing ton St.; Bryan St. to Clay St.
  6. Clay St.: Washington St. to Jefferson St.
  7. Benton St.: Washington St. to Clinton St.
  8. Jefferson St.: Clay St. to Calhoun St.

                                                                        City of Presidents Museum Planning Team Now Being Formed

 

A steering committee for the formation of a Presidential Museum to be located in Cuba City is now being established. Under the direction of Donna Rogers of the City of Presidents, with assistance of Cuba City’s Economic Development Director, the team is seeking individuals who would be interested in helping in the planning process.

The task is no small one, but would yield positive impact to the City in terms of increased tourism. Many museums in the region see annual visits well in excess of 10,000 people. With nearby tourism destinations such as Galena, the National Brewery Museum and the National Mississippi River Museum, the potential impact of a Presidential Museum in Cuba City is very strong. The Museum would also help to fulfill the 40 year old legacy of the City of Presidents as well as to enhance the perception of Cuba City.

The team’s mission statement reads, “To preserve and share Cuba City history as well the legacy of all the U.S. Presidents with the purpose of attracting, educating and inspiring the public.” In addition to using artifacts and interactive displays to tell the story of the 44 US Presidents, at least two Presidents will be featured each year to provide more detailed background on the leaders of the free world and American history.

Individuals interested in learning more about the project are encouraged to contact Donna Rogers at 563-599-0098 or Bob Jones at Cuba City City Hall 608-744-2152.

          ​                                                        

 

 

 

             ​

2015 Consumer Confidence Report Data
CUBA CITY WATERWORKS, PWS ID: 12200925

Water System Information

If you would like to know more about the information contained in this report, please contact Tom Longhenry at (608) 778-3244.

Opportunity for input on decisions affecting your water quality

City Hall Council Chambers on the 3rd Wednesday of every month at 5:00 p.m.

Full Report CCR Report 2015

 

                                                                          Volunteers Needed for Presidential Caboose

Would you like to help preserve and share the history of Cuba City? The City of Presidents need volunteers who can spare 4 hours from 10AM to 2PM on the Saturdays between Memorial Day and Labor Day. If interested please contact Donna Rogers at 563-599-0098.

                                                                           Cuba City on NBC 15 Where in Wisconsin

On Friday, April 22nd, NBC 15 from Madison visited Cuba City to film their Where in Wisconsin segment which was aired the fllowing Friday. You can see the episode here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNQyXqzwvos&feature=youtu.be

                                                               

 

Cuba City Endowment Fund

 

The Cuba City – City of Presidents Endowment Fund exists to provide long-term support for the many distinctive and admirable items that have been constructed over the years by many generous businesses, organizations and people.
In the November Cuba City utility bill there will be a brochure with details on how to donate in memory of a loved one, or how to make regular quarterly/monthly/annual gifts.  Form can also be found at:

http://www.cfsw.org/community-funds/cuba-city-city-of-presidents-endowment-fund/

We need to keep the endowment fund growing to preserve the landmarks that have made Cuba City – “The City of Presidents”.
All donations are sincerely appreciated no matter how large or small.
Thank you, City of Presidents Committee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

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